There's Something About Sujiko...

History :

Sujiko was created by Jai Kobayaashi Gomer of Kobayaashi Studios in the autumn of 2010. It was quickly signed up for syndication by Puzzler Media, along with its sister puzzle - Suko. Both puzzles were in turn snapped up by two of the largest newspaper titles in the UK - the Times and the Telegraph - where they continue to be featured today, as well as in the Sun, Readers' Digest and many other newspaper and magazine titles. Since then, several new puzzles have been added to the collection, each featuring the same 'Grid & Node' playboard used in the original puzzles - Dottoko, Loko and now TANKO each offer something different for the puzzling mind.

New newspaper and magazine titles are taking on these puzzles day by day, and now the release of four of them (Sujiko, Suko, Dottoko and TANKO) on the Apple App Store means that they're easy to play even if you don't have a copy of the Telegraph to hand!

Sujiko :

The playboard is composed of a 3 x 3 grid, with four circular spaces at the internal intersecting nodes of the grid. The objective is to "Place the numbers 1 to 9 in the spaces so that the number in each circle is equal to the sum of the four surrounding spaces." At least one number in the grid is filled in on most examples to ensure that each puzzle has only one possible solution.

Suko :

The spaces on the Suko grid are colour-coded, and linked to a set of numbers denoting the total of the numbers contained in that colour. The objective is to "Place the numbers 1 to 9 in the spaces so that the number in each circle is equal to the sum of the four surrounding spaces, and each colour total is correct." Each puzzle is configured to have only one possible solution.

Dottoko :

This new puzzle still uses the Grid & Node playboard, but the size of the playboard is variable - 5 x 5, 8 x 8, there are no limits. Each node on the playboard contains a number, which denotes the number of surrounding spaces which contains a dot. Each puzzle is configured to have only one possible solution.

Loko :

The playboard for Loko differs from previous offerings in that the nodes do not contain a number, but a symbol, denoting the nature of lines which may be attached as part of the puzzle's aim to "create a continuous pathway which links every node". As with Dottoko, there are no limits to the size of the playboard. Each puzzle is configured to have only one possible solution.

TANKO :

The most recent addition to the Kobayaashi collection of puzzles is TANKO, which offers, alongside the standard Grid & Node playboard, a list of words to be fitted into the grid such that "each word fits into one node and the four surrounding spaces". As with Dottoko and Loko, there are no limits to the size of the playboard, and each puzzle is configured to have only one possible solution.

   

 

 
 
 

 

 

 

 

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